Friday, March 21, 2008

Dust Off the Defibrillator!

Duke 71-Belmont 70

~Desi

Wednesday, March 19, 2008

Let's Go Duke!

What you are looking at is a picture of the Verizon Center in Washington, DC, where Duke will be playing its first and (hopefully!) second round games in the NCAA tournament. How's that for convenient?!

In the meantime, while we are gearing up for tip-off, I have created a little group on espn.com for tracking the results of our tournament brackets. This is just for fun, to follow how friends and family members are doing. If you are interested in joining our gang, just let me know and I'll get you all of the information you need to make it happen.

Just don't pick the Tar Heels! (Like one entrant, who shall remain nameless, has already done...)

~Steve

Tuesday, March 18, 2008

The Papal Children's Choir

Next month, Pope Benedict XVI will be visiting the United States, his first such trip since becoming Pontiff back in 2005. As part of his swing through DC, the Pope is going to celebrate Mass at Nationals Park, the new home to Washington's baseball team. As you can imagine, the demand for Papal Mass tickets is extraordinarily high, with requests coming in not just from around the Archdiocese of Washington, but literally from all over the world.

As far as the Ballas go, our little piece of this larger story is way, way cool. Z-man is part of a 175-member children's choir that will be singing at the Papal Mass! The choir, which has been assembled from parishes across the Archdiocese, has begun holding practices...and attracting media attention. So check out this story on the choir that ran the other day on the local Fox affiliate. And stay tuned for more updates on how things are progressing...

~Steve

Monday, March 17, 2008

Lenten Inspiration

The other night, we attended a beautiful Taize prayer service, full of song, scripture, and silence. Perhaps one of the most inspirational items, though, was a passage included at the beginning of the program. It was written by Brother Roger of Taize, a man whose mission was to reconcile Christians and whose letters and lessons highlight the importance of prayer in our lives:

In a technological society, there is a clear separation between prayer and work. When inner life and human solidarity appear to be in competition with one another, as if people had to choose between them, that opposition tears apart the very depths of the soul.

Prayer is a serene force at work within human beings, stirring them up, transforming them, never allowing them to close their eyes in the face of evil, of wars, of all that threatens the weak of this world. From it we draw the energy to wage other struggles--to enable our loved ones to survive, to transform the human condition, to make the earth a place fit to live.

All who walk in the footsteps of Christ, while being in the presence of God, remain alongside other people as well. They do not separate prayer and commitment.

~Desi